Essay: Why Smoking Should Not Be Banned - Online Essays

Some examples of these anti-smoking campaigns are the ban on smoking in public places in the UK since July 2007, under the Health Act 2006, the anti-smoking T.V advertisements and campaigns against allowing smokers the benefit of the NHS treatment, when they suffer from smoking related problems.

''Should smoking be banned?'' - Opinion essay

These laws have been successful in protecting nonsmokers, while there are still many cities that have not banned smoking in public, leaving themselves at risk....


Persuasive Essay On Smoking In Public Places Free Essays

Total ban of smoking including all public policies, health and safety regulations are put in place to prohibit tobacco smoking in campuses.

The ban from smoking in public will help to reduce the smokers intake of cigarettes/chemicals, cigarettes themselves are a danger to the earth, some may argue that this ban may damage the economy, and that smoking does not only effect the smoker himself/herself, it...


IELTS Writing Task 2: 'positive or negative' essay - Simon

From my point of view, it is more sensible to ban smoking in public places rather than allow second-hand smoke to continue to harm people nearby, who breathe in the smoke....

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The banning of smoking in public places would benefit everybody and should be imposed everywhere because it would reduce the risk of health problems to non-smokers, reduce the number of smokers all together, and reduce the amount of valuable money tax payers spend on smoking related expenses....

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This has been recognised as a major issue for the country and there are several things being done to try to stop it, such as the smoking ban in public places which was enforced on March the 26th 2006....

The Secret History Of The War On Public Drinking | …

(“Introduction to Smoking”) Over the last few decades there has been an ever increasing surge in the United States and all over the world to ban smoking in public places.

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This "academic" essay, written in tendentious sociological jargon and published in the "Advancing Women in Leadership Journal", attacks CP from a hardline feminist and "children's rights" ideological perspective. There is a lot about "hegemonic masculinity", wherein even Desmond Morris's ancient pseudo-anthropological fantasies about the "bent-over submissive posture" and CP as a "form of ritual copulation" are trotted out once more.
Few readers of either sex will, I suspect, be inclined to take any of this stuff seriously, but the document does include a plausible vignette of a day at a southern elementary school, including eyewitness accounts of paddlings of a girl and a boy.
The paper is mistaken, incidentally, in stating that the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child "calls for a worldwide ban on corporal punishment". The Convention does nothing of the sort. The words "corporal punishment" do not appear anywhere in it, and nor does it contain any references to paddling, spanking, or any similar wording. What it does call for is the protection of children from "mental and physical violence". When countries signed up to the Convention (which, in any case, the USA has not done), they cannot reasonably have supposed that it prohibited ordinary, moderate spanking or paddling which causes no injury.
Another error is the assertion that "every industrialized nation in the world, except the U.S., has abolished corporal punishment in schools". Singapore is certainly an industrialized country, to name but one where school CP is entirely legal and in widespread use.